Besides its beautiful beaches, the country has countless sights and experiences

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ther must-see attractions in Pelourinho are the baroque Church of Our Lady of the Rosary of the Blacks and Jorge Amado’s House, an institute dedicated to the work of one of Bahia’s and Brazil's most famous writers.Salvador is a city that breathes history and Pelourinho is its beating heart. The word pelourinho is Portuguese for "pillory", and the neighborhood is named after its central whipping post where slaves were punished. The district is well preserved, with architecture from the 17th and 18th centuries and, despite its sordid past, it is now a vibrant cultural meeting place where you'll find groups playing capoeira (a traditional Brazilian martial art), street sellers offering delicious food, and countless bands and individual musicians.

In a country as beautiful and diverse as Brazil, you could easily fill a list with hundreds of landmarks worth visiting. Brazil's beauty is not limited to its breathtaking nature, but also its architectural wonders and historical sites. To make your life easier, we have selected the country's top 11 landmarks, which are must-sees on any trip to Brazil.

1. Christ the Redeemer

The Christ the Redeemer statue (Cristo Redentor) is one of the first things people think of when the topic is Rio de Janeiro. On the top of Corcovado mountain, 710 meters above sea level, it is one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World. Besides admiring the statue itself, which is 38 meters tall and made entirely from soapstone, you can also enjoy a stunning panoramic view of the entire city. Below lie the Guanabara Bay, Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon, and the…

2. Sugarloaf Mountain

This is another sight in Rio that you cannot miss. Sugarloaf Mountain (Pão de Açúcar) is one of the city's most important features. More than 100 years ago, it received Brazil's first ever cableway, from which you get a glimpse of the incredible views Rio has to offer: its forest, beaches, and a majestic skyline. The cable car ride is 396 meters long and ends at the top of Sugarloaf Mountain. When Rio de Janeiro hosted the 2016 Olympic Games, the iconic hill tops of the Sugarloaf Mountain - which can be seen from practically anywhere in the city - served as the inspiration for the competition's logo, such is its importance to Rio.

3 Iguaçu Falls

Make sure to take a trip to Iguaçu National Park and feast your eyes on its 275 waterfalls, a truly stunning ancient site located on the border between Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay. Flora and fauna are plentiful at Iguaçu: nearly two thousand species of plants and animals can be found there, such as the rare jaguar, and it is no surprise that the park is a UNESCO Natural World Heritage Site. Getting around can be an adventure, you can choose between hiking, riding a bike, sailing on the river on a boat, or even flying over the falls on a helicopter.


4. The Meeting of Waters at the Negro and Solimões rivers

In the Brazilian Amazon, nature shows off its beauty in many of ways. One of the most interesting is the meeting of the waters from the Negro and Solimões rivers. The two rivers meet near Manaus, the capital of the state of Amazonas, and run side-by-side, without mixing, for almost six kilometers before coming together to form the iconic Amazon river. This phenomenon occurs because of the differences in composition, speed and temperature of each river. The Negro river is slower (2 km/h), warmer (28°C) and carries mostly dark, organic matter. The Solimões is faster (4-6 km/h), colder (22°C) and much lighter, carrying sediments from volcanic soil.


5. Pantanal

Spread across the states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul in the Midwest of Brazil, the Pantanal is a biome rich in biodiversity. UNESCO declared it a World Heritage Site and Biosphere Reserve. Thousands of species of plants and animals call these swampy plains home, and the fauna is truly Pantanal's main attraction. On boat trips around the region, you can see jaguars, alligators, countless fish species, exotic birds and an endless list of natural beauties.

6. Pelourinho

Salvador is a city that breathes history and Pelourinho is its beating heart. The word pelourinho is Portuguese for "pillory", and the neighborhood is named after its central whipping post where slaves were punished. The district is well preserved, with architecture from the

17th and 18th centuries and, despite its sordid past, it is now a vibrant cultural meeting place where you'll find groups playing capoeira (a traditional Brazilian martial art), street sellers offering delicious food, and countless bands and individual musicians.

Other must-see attractions in Pelourinho are the baroque Church of Our Lady of the Rosary of the Blacks and Jorge Amado’s House, an institute dedicated to the work of one of Bahia’s and Brazil's most famous writers.



7. The Old Town of Paraty

A colonial city founded in 1667, Paraty is a historic Brazilian landmark and national heritage site. During the Brazilian Gold Rush, a period in which the country produced huge quantities of gold and precious stones, this is where the shipments to Europe were sent from. Paraty's port is now a tourist attraction, along with its historical churches, houses, and cobblestone streets. Modern restaurants, bars, gift shops, and art galleries are abundant in the historic center. There are no cars allowed, making it a lovely place for a stroll at any time of day.


8. Mount Roraima

Mount Roraima is a stunning Brazilian landmark that is well and truly off the beaten path. The Mount Roraima National Park is located in the north of the state of Roraima, close to Brazil's border with Venezuela and Guyana. In this beautiful natural reserve, you'll find one of the oldest mountains on Earth. Mount Roraima is almost three kilometers high and over two billion years old. Besides the mountain itself, there are also beautiful rock formations, rivers, and waterfalls, and plenty of local guides to lead you through this magnificent location.


9. Lençois Maranhenses

In the northeastern state of Maranhão lies one of the most beautiful and unique places in the world. The Lençóis Maranhanses National Park is full of untouched white sand dunes and, during the rainy season, vivid green clear water lagoons, a truly unforgettable sight. Make sure to catch the sunset here after a relaxing swim in the lagoons.

10. Ouro Preto town center

During the Brazilian Gold Rush, the town of Ouro Preto, in Minas Gerais, was the richest place in Brazil. This colonial city has maintained its baroque buildings and churches and it is a living testimony of the 17th and 18th centuries, the first place in Brazil to be named a UNESCO World Heritage site, in 1980. Most of the sculptures of religious figures spread throughout this historic city were made by Aleijadinho, one of Brazil's most important artists.


11. Museum of Art of São Paulo (MASP)

Ask anyone who has visited São Paulo about the most iconic buildings in this thrilling megacity and they'll certainly have MASP on their list. The Museum of Art of São Paulo is located on Paulista Avenue, São Paulo's most important street. It is hard to miss it, as it is a huge modernist structure elevated above the street on four pillars, with the open space underneath used for fairs, gatherings, film sessions and music shows. Inside you'll find works by the most important masters in Western art, such as Picasso, Dalí, Degas, Turner, Van Gogh and many others.